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Assembly and Operating Instructions for HiViz.com Kits

 

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Preparing a Shutter Cable

 

Assembly instructions for other kits

 

If you're using your own shutter cable rather than one one of ours, see the instructions below. While the instructions are written for the Nikon MC-30 cable, the same steps may be used for other cables. The connector for the camera, of course, may be different than that for the MC-30. For your cable, you'll need to identify which wires have the shutter, AE/AF, and common functions. They may not necessarily have the same colors as those in the instructions below, and even if the colors are the same, the functions may be different. Some cables may have more than 3 wires, so you first have to determine which ones are the 3 relevant wires. To do this, open the pushbutton switch enclosure to see which wires are connected to the contacts. You should find inside what amounts to a two-stage switch with three contacts. One contact will be common to both stages. Another contact is for the half press of the button and a third for the full press. Once you've determined which 3 wires are the important ones, then you can proceed with the MC-30 instructions, making appropriate substitutions for colors.

 

If you have a continuity checker, you can use it together with the photos below to identify which pins have which functions.

 

Cable type

Camera plug with important pins indicated

Click on the photo for a larger view.

Notes
Nikon MC30 In order to orient the pins the same as in the photo, align the three keys.
Canon RS-80N3 In order to reach the contacts, push a piece of bare hook up wire into each hole.
Nikon MCDC2 You'll need a fine wire to serve as a contact.
Sony S1 You'll need a fine wire to serve as a contact.
Canon RS-60E3 This one is easy.

 

 

An Example Cable Conversion for the Nikon MC-30 Shutter Cable

 

Click on any photo for a larger view.

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    Step 1: Cutting the cable

     

    Cut the cable in two about 6 inches from the pushbutton remote. Set aside the remote for now. In Steps 2-4, you'll work with the camera end of the cable. In Step 5, we'll show you how to add a connector to the pushbutton end of the cable in order to restore its functionality.

     

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    Step 2: Stripping the wires

     

    For this step and the next, use the section of cable that has the 10-pin connector on one end. You'll also need the male 3.5mm plug. The plug is shown in the upper photo with the jacket removed.

     

    Slip the jacket onto the cut end of the cable as shown in the lower photo. Strip about a quarter inch of the outer black insulation off the cable. Then strip an 1/8" off each of the yellow, red, and white conductors.

     

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    Step 3: Soldering the connections

     

    Photo 1 shows where the three wires will be connected to the solder lugs. For reference, we've shown which part of the plug (tip, ring, or sleeve) each lug is electrically connected to. You'll make connections through the holes in the solder lugs indicated by the blue arrows.

     

    You'll need to thread each wire through its lug and solder it. This can be difficult so be patient. For each wire, twist the strands together first. Then drag the tip of the soldering iron over the twisted strands. The solder will help to keep the strands from unraveling when you thread them through the holes. This is called tinning the wire. Here are some other things to be careful of when soldering:

     

    • Don't crimp the metal tabs around the cable before soldering. If you do, the heat will melt the insulation and expose bare wires.

    • If you can't get all the strands of each wire through the hole, don't worry. You can clip off the stray strands later.

    • The lug for the white wire can take a lot of heating since there's so much metal. Make sure that it gets hot enough for the solder to flow freely. Remember to keep fingers away from the hot metal parts. Photo 2 shows a good solder joint for this lug.

    • When you're finished, examine the connections under a magnifying glass. If there are any stray strands of wire, clip them off. Make sure that there are no strands that short from one lug to another. If you have a connectivity meter, use it to check for correct connectivity between the tip, ring, and sleeve of the plug and the corresponding lugs.

       

    Photo 3 shows the completed solder joints.

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    Step 4: Completing the connector

     

    Now you can crimp the metal tabs around the black cable as shown in Photo 1. After crimping, slide the jack on and screw it into place. The completed plug is shown in Photo 2.

     

    Photo 3 shows the completed cable. The stereo plug will connect to the camera output jack on your trigger.

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    Step 5: Adding a female connector to the pushbutton cable

     

    For this step, you'll be using the part of the cable that has the pushbutton remote. Note that you need only carry out this step if you want to reassemble the original cable that you cut.

     

    When you started work on the cable, you cut off the pushbutton end of the cable. In case you want to be able to reassemble the cable to use the pushbutton at some point, you need to add a female 3.5mm connector to the cable. The connector with the jacket removed is shown in Photo 1.

     

    Cut off the collar of the plastic jacket as shown in Photo 2. This will make it easier to slip the jacket on the cable.

     

    Now slip the jacket onto the cut end of the cable. (Photo 3)

     

    Strip the three wires as you did in Step 2 above. (Photo 4)

     

    You'll thread the wires onto the solder lugs as shown in Photo 5. You'll find this difficult. Tinning the wires first may help. If you can't get all the strands through the holes, you can trim them later.

     

    The completed soldering job is shown in Photo 6. Remember to examine the solder joints closely and trim any stray wires. Crimp the tabs of the sleeve onto the cable.

     

    Slip the jacket over the wires and screw into place as shown in Photo 7.

     

    The final result with the stereo connector on the pushbutton cable is shown in Photo 8.

     

    Now reassemble the pushbutton end of the cable with the camera end as shown in Photo 9. Be sure to push the connectors together completely.

     

    Test the reassembled cable as follows:

    • Connect the 10-pin connector to your camera and turn your camera on. Make sure your camera is set in a mode that autofocuses and the subject is far enough away for the camera to focus on it. If nothing happened, so far, so good.
    • Depress the button on the pushbutton remote halfway. Your camera should autofocus.
    • Depress the button all the way. The shutter should actuate.

    If the cable passed the tests above, congratulations! You made good connections. If, however, your camera autofocused without pressing the shutter button, that means the white and yellow wires are shorted together. Don't worry, take the jacket off, find the short, and remove it. If your camera shutter actuated before pressing the button, then you have a short between the red and white wires. Take off the jacket and fix it.

     

     

 

 


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